Category Archives: CANADA A CORPORATE SEC REGISTERED ENTITY IS ULTRA VIRES

‘England conquered half the world in successive fits of absence of mind.’

Canada’s Forgotten Founders: The Modern Signifance of the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) Application for Membership in the League of Nations

By: Grace Li Xiu Woo PhD Candidate, Université du Québec à Montréal, Montreal, Canada glxwoo@hotmail.com….

‘England conquered half the world in successive fits of absence of mind.’
Sir John Seeley, Professor of History
Cambridge University 1869 – 1895
– Dawson (1937: 196) –

1. Introduction

Countries like Canada that are a product of the colonial process, are faced with a paradox. We have been attempting to reorient our laws to accord with modern equality rights without bothering to reevaluate the way our history was constructed during the age of imperial expansion and aggression. This paper seeks to address some of the resulting ambiguity by raising awareness of one pivotal event. Though omitted from most accounts of the 20th century, it deserves a prominent place in our collective memory, not only because of the light it casts on the development of Canada’s national identity, but also because it provides a key to understanding why success eludes our well-meaning attempts to achieve both international peace and a solution for complex Indigenous rights issues.

Continue reading ‘England conquered half the world in successive fits of absence of mind.’

Canada Day celebrations across the country, but CANADA has not paid The Anishinabe Government of Turtle Island the Rent For 150 YEARS!

  • Experience should teach us to be most on our guard to protect liberty when the Government’s purposes are beneficent. Men born to freedom are naturally alert to repel invasion of their liberty by evil-minded rulers. The greatest dangers to liberty lurk in the insidious encroachment by men of zeal, well meaning but without understanding.  Louis D. Brandeis
  • The most certain test by which we judge whether a country is really free is the amount of security enjoyed by minorities. Lord Acton

Canada Day celebrations across the country, but CANADA has not paid The Anishinabe Government of Turtle Island the Rent For 150 YEARS!

Continue reading Canada Day celebrations across the country, but CANADA has not paid The Anishinabe Government of Turtle Island the Rent For 150 YEARS!

Anishinabe Utilities Commission (AUC)

Anishinabe Nations of The Great Turtle Island Environmental Assessment – examines a project to determine what the environmental, social, economic and health implications may be; Public interest decision – the applicable AEB Board  decides whether it is in the public interest to let the project go ahead;

Approval with conditions – multiple regulators give formal approval to the project under various pieces of legislation. These approvals are in the Tribal Nations and People of The Tribal Nations interest, decision could be made by three potential boards, depending on the type of project.

The boards include the Anishinabe Utilities Commission (AUC), the Anishinabe Energy Resources Department (AERD) and The Great Turtle Island Resources Conservation Office (GTINRCO). set specific conditions under which the project can be constructed and operate; and Compliance – ensure that the project is operating within the specified approval conditions. All significant Resource and projects which affect or potentially effect the Environment will be required to go through the Anishinabe Environmental Assessment Process.

There are also environmental assessments conducted in Turtle Island which fall under the responsibility of ESRD and are mandated by EPEA regarding Water.

The Government of The Great Turtle Island, Individual Tribal Nations in the Federations, businesses and Bank institutions also undertake environmental assessment processes under their own laws and authority, for a variety of purposes.

EIA reports typically include:

• a detailed description of the project;

• the location and environmental setting for the project, and baseline environmental, social and culture information;

• the potential positive and negative environmental, health, social, economic and cultural effects of the proposed activity;

• plans to mitigate potential adverse effects and to respond to emergencies;

• information on public and (First Nations) Tribal consultation; and

• an assessment of cumulative effects .