Category Archives: E-Governance

Anishinabe Environmental assessment authority to be set up:

Anishinabe Environmental Assessment Directive (AEAD) applies to a wide range of public plans and programmes (e.g. on land use, transport, energy, waste, agriculture, etc).

Plans and programmes in the sense of the AEAD Directive must be prepared or adopted by an authority (at national, regional or local level) and be required by legislative, regulatory or administrative provisions.

An Environmental Assessment is mandatory for plans/programmes which are prepared for agriculture, forestry, fisheries, energy, industry, transport, waste/ water management, telecommunications, tourism, town & country planning or land use and which set the framework for future development consent of projects listed in the AEAD Directive.

OR

Have been determined to require an assessment under the AEAD Directive.

The AEAD procedure can be summarized as follows: an environmental report is prepared in which the likely significant effects on the environment and the reasonable alternatives of the proposed plan or programme are identified. The public and the environmental authorities are informed and consulted on the draft plan or programme and the environmental report prepared. As regards plans and programmes which are likely to have significant effects on the environment in another Member State, the Member State in whose territory the plan or programme is being prepared must consult the other Member State(s). On this issue the AEAD Directive follows the general approach taken by the AEAD Protocol.

The environmental report and the results of the consultations are taken into account before adoption. Once the plan or programme is adopted, the environmental authorities and the public are informed and relevant information is made available to them. In order to identify unforeseen adverse effects at an early stage, significant environmental effects of the plan or programme are to be monitored.

The AEAD requires the environmental authorities to be consulted at the screening stage;

the AEAD requires an assessment of reasonable alternatives (under the EIA the developer chooses the alternatives to be studied);

under the AEAD Member States must monitor the significant environmental effects of the implementation of plans/programmes in order to identify unforeseen adverse effects and undertake appropriate remedial action.

the AEAD obliges Member States to ensure that environmental reports are of a sufficient quality.

 

ARTICLE 102 OF THE CHARTER OF THE UNITED NATIONS

REGISTRATION AND PUBLICATION OF TREATIES AND INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENTS: REGULATIONS TO GIVE EFFECT TO ARTICLE 102 OF THE CHARTER OF THE UNITED NATIONS

        Adopted by the General Assembly on 14 December 1946 [Resolution 97 (1)], as modified by resolutions 364 B (IV), 482 (V) and 33/141 A, adopted by the General Assembly on 1 December 1949, 12 December 1950 and 18 December 1978, respectively.

        The General Assembly,

        Considering it desirable to establish rules for the application of Article 102 of the Charter of the United Nations which provides as follows:

           1. Every treaty and every international agreement entered into by any Member of the United Nations after the present Charter comes into force shall as soon as possible be registered with the Secretariat and published by it.

           2.  No party to any such treaty or international agreement which has not been registered in accordance with the provisions of paragraph 1 of this Article may invoke that treaty or agreement before any organ of the United Nations.

        Recognizing, in making provision therefor, the importance of orderly registration and publication of such treaties and international agreements and the maintenance of precise records;

        Adopts accordingly, having given consideration to the proposals of the Secretary-General submitted pursuant to the resolution of the General Assembly of 10 February 1946, the following regulations:

PART ONE
REGISTRATION

Article 1

1. Every treaty or international agreement, whatever its form and descriptive name, entered into by one or more Members of the United Nations after 24 October 1945, the date of the coming into force of the Charter, shall as soon as possible be registered with the Secretariat in accordance with these regulations.

2. Registration shall not take place until the treaty or international agreement has come into force between two or more of the parties thereto.

3. Such registration may be effected by any party or in accordance with article 4 of these regulations.

4. The Secretariat shall record the treaties and international agreements so registered in a register established for that purpose.

Article 2
        1. When a treaty or international agreement has been registered with the Secretariat, a certified statement regarding any subsequent action which effects a change in the parties thereto, or the terms, scope or application thereof, shall also be registered with the Secretariat.

2. The Secretariat shall record the certified statement so registered in the register establishment under article 1 of these regulations.

Article 3
        1. Registration by a party, in accordance with article 1 of these regulations, relieves all other parties of the obligation to register.

2. Registration effected in accordance with article 4 of these regulations relieves all parties of the obligation to register.

Article 4
        1. Every treaty or international agreement subject to article 1 of these regulations shall be registered ex officio by the United Nations in the following cases:

(a)  Where the United Nations is a party to the treaty or agreement;

        (b) Where the United Nations has been authorized by the treaty or agreement to effect
registration;

        (c)  Where the United Nations is the depository of a multilateral treaty or agreement.

2. A treaty or international agreement subject to article 1 of these regulations may be
registered with the Secretariat by a specialized agency in the following cases:

(a)  Where the constituent instrument of the specialized agency  provides for  such
registration;

        (b) Where the treaty or agreement has been registered with the specialized agency pursuant
to the terms of its constituent  instrument;

        (c)  Where the specialized agency has been authorized by the treaty or  agreement to effect
registration.

Article 5
       1. A party or specialized agency, registering a treaty or international agreement under article 1 or 4 of these regulations, shall certify that the text is a true and complete copy thereof and includes all reservations made by parties thereto.

2. The certified copy shall reproduce the text in all the languages in which the treaty or agreement was concluded and shall be accompanied by two additional copies and by a statement setting forth, in respect of each party:

(a The date on which the treaty or agreement has come into force;

(b)  The method whereby it has come into force (for example:by signature, by ratification or
acceptance, by accession, et cetera).

Article 6
        The date of receipt by the Secretariat of the United Nations of the treaty or international agreement registered shall be deemed to be the date of registration, provided that the date of registration of a treaty or agreement registered ex officio by the United Nations shall be the date on which the treaty or agreement first came into force between two or more of the parties thereto.

Article 7
        A certificate of registration signed by the Secretary-General or his representative shall be issued to the registering party or agency and also, upon request, to any party to the treaty or international agreement registered.

Article 8
        1. The register shall be kept in the English and French languages. The register shall comprise in respect of each treaty or international agreement, a record of:

(a)  The serial number given in the order of registration;

(b)  The title given to the instrument by the parties;

  (c)  The names of the parties between whom it was concluded;

(d) The dates of signature, ratification or acceptance, exchange of  ratification, accession,
and entry into force;

       (e)  The duration;

(f)  The language or languages in which it was drawn up;

(g) The name of the party or specialized agency which registers the instrument and the date
of such registration;

(h Particulars of publication in the treaty series of the United  Nations.

2. Such information shall also be included in the register in regard to the statements registered under article 2 of these regulations.

3. The texts registered shall be marked “ne varietur” by the Secretary-General or his representative, and shall remain in the custody of the Secretariat.

Article 9
        The Secretary-General, or his representative, shall issue certified extracts from the register at the request of any Member of the United Nations or any party to the treaty or international agreement concerned. In other cases he may issue such extracts at his discretion.

PART TWO
FILING AND RECORDING

Article 10

The Secretariat shall file and record treaties and international agreements, other than those subject to registration under article 1 of these regulations, if they fall in the following categories:

      (a)  Treaties or international agreements entered into by the United Nations or by one or
more of the specialized agencies;

(b Treaties or international agreements transmitted by a Member of the United Nations
which were entered into before the coming into force of the Charter, but which were not
included in the treaty series of the League of Nations;

      (c)  Treaties or international agreements transmitted by a party not a member of the United
Nations which were entered into before or after the coming into force of the Charter
which were not included in the treaty series of the League of Nations, provided,
however, that this paragraph shall be applied with full regard to the provisions of the
resolution of the General Assembly of 10 February 1946 set forth in the Annex to these
regulations.

Article 11
        The provisions of articles 2, 5 and 8 of these regulations shall apply, mutatis mutandis, to all treaties and international agreements filed and recorded under article 10 of these regulations.

PART THREE
PUBLICATION

Article 12

1. The Secretariat shall publish as soon as possible in a single series every treaty or international agreement which is registered or filed and recorded, in the original language or languages, followed by a translation in English and in French. The certified statements referred to in article 2 of thes regulations shall be published in the same manner.

2. The Secretariat will, however, have the option not to publish in extenso a bilateral treaty or international agreement belonging to one of the following categories:

(a)  Assistance and cooperation agreements of limited scope concerning  financial,
commercial, administrative or technical matters;

(b)  Agreements relating to the organization of conferences, seminars or  meetings;

(c)  Agreements that are to be published otherwise than in the series mentioned in paragraph 1
of this article by the United Nations Secretariat or by a specialized or related agency.

3. In deciding whether or not to publish in extenso a treaty or international agreement belonging to one of the categories mentioned in paragraph 2 of this article, the Secretariat shall duly take into account, inter alia, the practical value that might accrue from in extenso publication. Treaties and international agreements that the Secretariat intends not to publish in extensoshall be identified as such in the monthly statements of treaties and international agreements provided for in article 13 of these regulations, it being understood that a decision not to publish in extenso may be reversed at any time.

4. Any State or intergovernmental organization may obtain from the Secretary-General a copy of the text of any treaty or international agreement which it has been decided, pursuant to paragraph 2 of this article, not to publish in extenso. The Secretariat shall likewise make a copy of any such treaty or agreement available to private persons against payment.

5. In respect of each treaty or international agreement registered or filed and recorded, the series referred to in paragraph I of this article shall include at least the following information: the registration or recording number, the names of the parties, the title, the date and place of conclusion, the date and method of entry into force, the duration (where appropriate), the languages of conclusion, the name of the State or organization that has registered it or transmitted it for filing and recording, and, if appropriate, references to publications in which the complete text of the treaty or international agreement is reproduced.

Article 13
        The Secretariat shall publish every month a statement of the treaties and international agreements registered, or filed and recorded, during the preceding month, giving the dates and numbers of registration and recording.

Article 14
        The Secretariat shall send to all Members of the United Nations the series referred to in article 12 and the monthly statement referred to in article 13 of these regulations.

ANNEX
RESOLUTION ADOPTED BY THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY ON 10 FEBRUARY 1946

ON REGISTRATION OF TREATIES AND INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENTS 1/

NOTE BY THE SECRETARIAT

Under Article 102 of the Charter of the United Nations every treaty and every international agreement entered into by any Member of the United Nations after the coming into force of the Charter shall, as soon as possible, be registered with the Secretariat and published by it. Furthermore, no party to a treaty or international agreement subject to registration which has not been registered may invoke that treaty or agreement before any organ of the United Nations. The General Assembly, by resolution 97 (1), established regulations to give effect to Article 102 of the Charter (see text of the regulations, vol. 76, p. XVIII).

The terms “treaty” and “international agreement” have not been defined either in the Charter or in the regulations, and the Secretariat follows the principle that it acts in accordance with the position of the Member State submitting an instrument for registration that so far as that party is concerned the instrument is a treaty or an international agreement within the meaning of Article 102. Registration of an instrument submitted by a Member State, therefore, does not imply a judgement by the Secretariat on the nature of the instrument, the status of a party or any similar question. It is the understanding of the Secretariat that its action does not confer on the instrument the status of a treaty or an international agreement if it does not already have that status and does not confer on a party a status which it would not otherwise have.

Unless otherwise indicated, the translations of the original texts of treaties, etc., published in this Series have been made by the Secretariat of the United Nations.
1/ United Nations, Treaty Series, Vol. 1, p. XXVIII.

Anishinabe National Bank

Welcome to the website of the Anishinabe Central Bank of The Great Turtle Island which is the Central Bank of The Great Turtle Island. Standing at the center of The Anishinabe Nations of The Great Turtle Island financial system, the Bank is committed to promoting and maintaining monetary and financial stability as its contribution to a healthy economy.

The Anishinabe Central Bank Anishinabe Central Bank – ANB was created in 2010. It has technical, administrative and financial autonomy. Its main goals are price stability and regulation and supervision of the Financial System and Payment System. To ensure full implementation of those purposes, applies the necessary monetary instruments, and regulates and supervises the implementation of rules related to the financial system.

The Bank of The Anishinabe Nations of The Great Turtle Island is committed to increasing awareness and understanding of its activities and responsibilities, across both general and specialist audiences alike.   Information about the ANB including its monetary policy and other functions, can be accessed through the menu at left.  Please feel free to contact us for any query.

Continue reading Anishinabe National Bank

TITLE 18 SECTION 1621 … 18 USC § 1621 – Perjury generally …

TITLE 18 SECTION 1621 … 18 USC § 1621 – Perjury generally … Whoever—
(1) having taken an oath before a competent tribunal, officer, or person, in any case in which a law of the United States authorizes an oath to be administered, that he will testify, declare, depose, or certify truly, or that any written testimony, declaration, deposition, or certificate by him subscribed, is true, willfully and contrary to such oath states or subscribes any material matter which he does not believe to be true; or
(2) in any declaration, certificate, verification, or statement under penalty of perjury as permitted under section 1746 of title 28, United States Code, willfully subscribes as true any material matter which he does not believe to be true;
is guilty of perjury and shall, except as otherwise expressly provided by law, be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than five years, or both. This section is applicable whether the statement or subscription is made within or without the United States.

TITLE 15 SECTION 1692 E … 15 USC § 1692e – False or misleading representations

TITLE 15 SECTION 1692 E … 15 USC § 1692e – False or misleading representations … A debt collector may not use any false, deceptive, or misleading representation or means in connection with the collection of any debt. Without limiting the general application of the foregoing, the following conduct is a violation of this section:
(1) The false representation or implication that the debt collector is vouched for, bonded by, or affiliated with the United States or any State, including the use of any badge, uniform, or facsimile thereof.
(2) The false representation of—
(A) the character, amount, or legal status of any debt; or
(B) any services rendered or compensation which may be lawfully received by any debt collector for the collection of a debt.
(3) The false representation or implication that any individual is an attorney or that any communication is from an attorney.
(4) The representation or implication that nonpayment of any debt will result in the arrest or imprisonment of any person or the seizure, garnishment, attachment, or sale of any property or wages of any person unless such action is lawful and the debt collector or creditor intends to take such action.
(5) The threat to take any action that cannot legally be taken or that is not intended to be taken.
(6) The false representation or implication that a sale, referral, or other transfer of any interest in a debt shall cause the consumer to—
(A) lose any claim or defense to payment of the debt; or
(B) become subject to any practice prohibited by this subchapter.
(7) The false representation or implication that the consumer committed any crime or other conduct in order to disgrace the consumer.
(8) Communicating or threatening to communicate to any person credit information which is known or which should be known to be false, including the failure to communicate that a disputed debt is disputed.
(9) The use or distribution of any written communication which simulates or is falsely represented to be a document authorized, issued, or approved by any court, official, or agency of the United States or any State, or which creates a false impression as to its source, authorization, or approval.
(10) The use of any false representation or deceptive means to collect or attempt to collect any debt or to obtain information concerning a consumer.
(11) The failure to disclose in the initial written communication with the consumer and, in addition, if the initial communication with the consumer is oral, in that initial oral communication, that the debt collector is attempting to collect a debt and that any information obtained will be used for that purpose, and the failure to disclose in subsequent communications that the communication is from a debt collector, except that this paragraph shall not apply to a formal pleading made in connection with a legal action.
(12) The false representation or implication that accounts have been turned over to innocent purchasers for value.
(13) The false representation or implication that documents are legal process.
(14) The use of any business, company, or organization name other than the true name of the debt collector’s business, company, or organization.
(15) The false representation or implication that documents are not legal process forms or do not require action by the consumer.
(16) The false representation or implication that a debt collector operates or is employed by a consumer reporting agency as defined by section 1681a (f) of this title.

Turtle Island Tobacco

There is a rumor of Turtle Island Tobacco being designated as contraband by the Canadian Government. To set the record straight, The Governing Nations of The Great Turtle Island was here long long before the European White-man came to Turtle Island. It is with this in mind that the Europeans have deceived through legal trickery and fraud the people of The Great Turtle Island with hearsay and forged documents for hundreds of years.

The aim of the legal trickery and fraud stems from the white-mans attempt to control the Sovran Nations of The Great Turtle Island, including but not limited to the Resources of The Great Turtle Island, and the Trade and commerce of The Nations and People of The Great Turtle Island.

We invite The Attorney General of Canada or The Attorney General of British Columbia, the RCMP or any other provinces or any party interested or attempting to perpetuate the fraud, let them prove that they are legal entities beyond Corporate Entities by submitting an Original Certified Legal Copy of The British North America Act from the House of Lords in The UK as legal proof of the Entities of CANADA and The Provinces being valid.

The Certified True Copy of The British North America Act of 1867 as held and recorded in the House of Lords in the UK, shows planely that the two houses Commons and Lords signed off on the BNA ACT of 1867, however The Queen did not sign the legal document, and as such the Document held in Ottawa is a fraudulent copy, that has perpetuated the fraud of CANADA, this has legal bearings on all trade and commerce put across by The Province of British Columbia, all The Provinces and CANADA, the consequence of such fraud being perpetuated by those who knew of the Constitutional legality over the last 150 years is staggering in regards to business contracts made between The Provinces and CANADA and any other entity.

If the proof is not submitted within 60 days from Jan 1st 2016 then know now and forever that no jurisdiction of Canada or The Province of British Columbia or any Provinces exist as anything other than SEC Registered Corporate Entities and as such by masquerading as A Sovereign Nation of CANADA these corporate entities are acting Ultra Vires that is beyond the scope of their ability to act legally.

With this in mind the onus of proof of those who have any interest in the corporate entity of CANADA, or Province of British Columbia or Provinces to either provide such certified copies or face prosecution under UCC for fraud as individuals or entities that are complicit in such fraud.

The Province of British Columbia and The Provinces and CANADA are hereby on 60 day notice to provide such documentation or leave all matters pertaining to The Sovran Nation of The Great Turtle Island and Trade and Treaties, in regard to trade and commerce and any such treaties as The Nations that make up The Nations of The Great Turtle Island.

As of this date Dec 31st 2015 any and all names of any individuals or entities acting on such fraudulent bases with any documents submitted will be individually charged with fraud, govern thyself accordingly.

H.E Embassador ARARITA
Permanent Representative
The Anishinabi Nations of The Great Turtle Island.
The Anishinabe Nations of The Great Turtle IslandNews of The Great Turtle Island

Establish

Clear and mutually advantageous rules governing their trade and in such a manner as will enhance the efforts of the other Partners and shall in no way impair, impede or frustrate the right or efforts of any of the other Partners to formulate their own foreign aid or investments in relation to each other and the ability of the other Partners in achieving their international aims and objectives, in particular, the Partners will when appropriate and permissible,

  1. In the spirit of co-operation, ensure free flow of information concerning international affairs,
  1. Undertake to protect each other’s business affairs and transactions from all or any external or third party attempts to undermine their respective international rights, privileges and freedom to conduct its Sovereign business,
  1. This includes the setting up of a Chamber of Commerce to protect the cultural and intellectual property rights of each Nation;