Category Archives: Services

We all eat out of the Dish – all of us unique peoples – but it only has one spoon.

Land Acknowledgement

“Toronto is in the ‘Dish With One Spoon Territory’. The Dish With One Spoon is a treaty between the Anishinaabe, Mississaugas and Haudenosaunee that bound them to share the territory and protect the land. Subsequent Indigenous nations and peoples, Europeans and all newcomers have been invited into this treaty in the spirit of peace, friendship and respect.”

“Toronto is in the ‘Dish With One Spoon Territory’. The Dish With One Spoon is a treaty between the Anishinaabe, Mississaugas and Haudenosaunee that bound them to share the territory and protect the land. Subsequent Indigenous nations and peoples, Europeans and all newcomers have been invited into this treaty in the spirit of peace, friendship and respect.”

To hereby be The “Dish” or sometimes it is called the “Bowl” represents what is now southern Ontario (from the Great Lake to Quebec and from Lake Simcoe into the U.S.). We all eat out of the Dish – all of us unique peoples – but it only has one spoon. That means we have to share and that we have responsibilities to make sure the dish is never empty (to take care of the land and the creatures we share it with). Importantly, there are no knives at the table. We must keep the peace. The dish is graphically represented by the wampum represented below:

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This was a treaty made between the Anishinaabe and Haudenosaunee after the French and Indian War. Newcomers were then incorporated into it over the years, notably at 1764 (The Royal Proclamation/The Treaty of Niagara).

The purpose of the acknowledgement started in B.C., where there are no treaties at all. So people were actually living, working, meeting on stolen land. Its popularity has spread as an acknowledgment of presence and assertion of Indigenous sovereignty. 

Land Acknowledgement at Ryerson University:

CEASE and DESIST issued to CANADA and PROVINCES July 5th 2016 for promoting themselves as Turtle Island

CEASE and DESIST issued to CANADA and PROVINCES July 5th 2016.

The Government of Turtle Island, issues  CANADA and PROVINCES an order To Cease and Desist promoting themselves as Turtle Island, Kannada, affiliated or representative in any matters of The Great Turtle Island, or as Kannada aka Anishinabe Village .  Websites infringement on  Anishinabe Nation of Turtle Island copyright. CANADA AND THE PROVINCES face Litigation for promoting CANADA AND OR PROVINCES referring to Turtle Island, any Canadian entity is ordered to Cease  and Desist doing so immediately for violating UCC.

 

Canada and The Provinces of Canada, are SEC Corporate Entities, promoting themselves as a Sovereign Country, thus Canada and The Provinces are Ultra Vires.

Government entities created by a state are public corporations governed by municipal charters and other statutorily imposed grants of power. These grants of authority are analogous to a private corporation’s articles of incorporation. Historically, the Ultra Vires concept has been used to construe the powers of a government entity narrowly. Failure to observe the statutory limits has been characterized as ultra vires.

In the case of a private business entity, the act of an employee who is not authorized to act on the entity’s behalf may,nevertheless, bind the entity contractually if such an employee would normally be expected to have that authority. Withgovernment entity, however, to prevent a contract from being voided as Ultra Vires, it is normally necessary to prove that the employee actually had authority to act. Where a government employee exceeds her authority, the government entity may seek to rescind the contract based on an ultra vires claim.

CANADA and The PROVINCES are violating the CONVENTION AGAINST CORRUPTION RATIFIED BY 30TH STATE, ENTERED INTO FORCE 14 DECEMBER 2005.

CANADA and The PROVINCES are violating THE VIENNA CONVENTION ON CONSULAR RELATIONS AND OPTIONAL PROTOCOLS

CANADA AND THE PROVINCES have, and continue to commit Fraud against the Anishinabe Nation of Turtle Island.

The following sites promote dealing with SEC Companies that are Ultra Vires  by promoting dealing with CANADA AND THE PROVINCES promoting licensing and laws, on Indigenous Land, which create Fraudulent Contracts, which are Ultra Vires.

CANADA AND THE PROVINCES Companies involved in Massive Global Fraud, against All People and Nations of The Great Turtle Island.

http://www.turtleislandstaffing.info/

https://holisticassessment.gov.sk.ca/digitalstories/aski/

Home

Home

 

 

http://www.turtleisland.org/resources/resources.htm

 

http://turtleisland.ca/

 

Turtle Island – Staffing Services – Ottawa

The Anishinabe Nation of Turtle Island, caution the Corporation of CANADA and THE PROVINCES about their continual Copyright infringements.

Originally the Settlers came to live in Anishinabe Villages called Kannada, the Settlers were / are referred to as Aboriginals, meaning not Originals.

 

 

 

 

Anishinabe Nation of The Great Turtle Island Environmental AEB Board Assessment

Anishinabe Nation of The Great Turtle Island Environmental Assessment – examines a project to determine what the environmental, social, economic and health implications may be; Public interest decision – the applicable AEB Board  decides whether it is in the public interest to let the project go ahead;

Approval with conditions – multiple regulators give formal approval to the project under various pieces of legislation. These approvals are in the Tribal Nations and People of The Tribal Nations interest, decision could be made by three potential boards, depending on the type of project.

The boards include the Anishinabe Utilities Commission (AUC), the Anishinabe Energy Resources Department (AERD) and The Great Turtle Island Resources Conservation Office (GTINRCO). set specific conditions under which the project can be constructed and operate; and Compliance – ensure that the project is operating within the specified approval conditions. All significant Resource and projects which affect or potentially effect the Environment will be required to go through the Anishinabe Environmental Assessment Process.

There are also environmental assessments conducted in Turtle Island which fall under the responsibility of ESRD and are mandated by EPEA regarding Water.

The Government of The Great Turtle Island, Individual Tribal Nations in the Federations, businesses and Bank institutions also undertake environmental assessment processes under their own laws and authority, for a variety of purposes.

EIA reports typically include:

• a detailed description of the project;

• the location and environmental setting for the project, and baseline environmental, social and culture information;

• the potential positive and negative environmental, health, social, economic and cultural effects of the proposed activity;

• plans to mitigate potential adverse effects and to respond to emergencies;

• information on public and (First Nations) Tribal consultation; and

• an assessment of cumulative effects .

Anishinabe mythology a Wolf character is the brother and true best friend of the culture hero

“Wolves figure prominently in the mythology of nearly every Native American tribe. In most Native cultures, Wolf is considered a medicine being associated with courage, strength, loyalty, and success at hunting. Like bears, wolves are considered closely related to humans by many North American tribes, and the origin stories of some Northwest Coast tribes, such as the Quileute and the Kwakiutl, tell of their first ancestors being transformed from wolves into men. In Shoshone mythology, Wolf plays the role of the noble Creator god, while in Anishinabe mythology a wolf character is the brother and true best friend of the culture hero. Among the Pueblo tribes, wolves are considered one of the six directional guardians, associated with the east and the color white. The Zunis carve stone wolf fetishes for protection, ascribing to them both healing and hunting powers.” Continue reading Anishinabe mythology a Wolf character is the brother and true best friend of the culture hero

The Great Turtle Island Resources Conservation Office (GTINRCO)

Anishinabe Nations of The Great Turtle Island Environmental Assessment – examines a project to determine what the environmental, social, economic and health implications may be; Public interest decision – the applicable AEB Board  decides whether it is in the public interest to let the project go ahead;

Approval with conditions – multiple regulators give formal approval to the project under various pieces of legislation. These approvals are in the Tribal Nations and People of The Tribal Nations interest, decision could be made by three potential boards, depending on the type of project.

The boards include the Anishinabe Utilities Commission (AUC), the Anishinabe Energy Resources Department (AERD) and The Great Turtle Island Resources Conservation Office (GTINRCO). set specific conditions under which the project can be constructed and operate; and Compliance – ensure that the project is operating within the specified approval conditions. All significant Resource and projects which affect or potentially effect the Environment will be required to go through the Anishinabe Environmental Assessment Process.

There are also environmental assessments conducted in Turtle Island which fall under the responsibility of ESRD and are mandated by EPEA regarding Water.

The Government of The Great Turtle Island, Individual Tribal Nations in the Federations, businesses and Bank institutions also undertake environmental assessment processes under their own laws and authority, for a variety of purposes.

EIA reports typically include:

• a detailed description of the project;

• the location and environmental setting for the project, and baseline environmental, social and culture information;

• the potential positive and negative environmental, health, social, economic and cultural effects of the proposed activity;

• plans to mitigate potential adverse effects and to respond to emergencies;

• information on public and (First Nations) Tribal consultation; and

• an assessment of cumulative effects .

Anishinabe Utilities Commission (AUC)

Anishinabe Nations of The Great Turtle Island Environmental Assessment – examines a project to determine what the environmental, social, economic and health implications may be; Public interest decision – the applicable AEB Board  decides whether it is in the public interest to let the project go ahead;

Approval with conditions – multiple regulators give formal approval to the project under various pieces of legislation. These approvals are in the Tribal Nations and People of The Tribal Nations interest, decision could be made by three potential boards, depending on the type of project.

The boards include the Anishinabe Utilities Commission (AUC), the Anishinabe Energy Resources Department (AERD) and The Great Turtle Island Resources Conservation Office (GTINRCO). set specific conditions under which the project can be constructed and operate; and Compliance – ensure that the project is operating within the specified approval conditions. All significant Resource and projects which affect or potentially effect the Environment will be required to go through the Anishinabe Environmental Assessment Process.

There are also environmental assessments conducted in Turtle Island which fall under the responsibility of ESRD and are mandated by EPEA regarding Water.

The Government of The Great Turtle Island, Individual Tribal Nations in the Federations, businesses and Bank institutions also undertake environmental assessment processes under their own laws and authority, for a variety of purposes.

EIA reports typically include:

• a detailed description of the project;

• the location and environmental setting for the project, and baseline environmental, social and culture information;

• the potential positive and negative environmental, health, social, economic and cultural effects of the proposed activity;

• plans to mitigate potential adverse effects and to respond to emergencies;

• information on public and (First Nations) Tribal consultation; and

• an assessment of cumulative effects .

The Anishinabe Nations of The Great Turtle Island have adopted The ISO 14001 standard

 http://turtleislandgov.info/?p=135

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hCAa7OWdjfo

The Anishinabe Nations of The Great Turtle Island have adopted the ISO 14001 as the preliminary foundation for the Anishinabe Environmental Assessment Authority.

The ISO 14001 standard specifies a process for the control and the continuous improvement of an organisation’s environmental performance. The management tool enables an organisation to identify and control the environmental impact of its activities, products and services; to continuously improve its environmental performance; and, to implement a systematic approach to set and achieve environmental objectives and targets.The ISO 14001 standard applies to those environmental aspects identified and controlled or influenced by the organisation.  The ISO 14001 standard does not specify environmental performance criteria but merely how to develop an EMS.

Currently within Anishinabe Tribal Nations the policy for the Environmental Assessment will be based on organisations certified to the highly recognizable ISO 14001 standard. At the end of December 2008 there were over 188,000 organisations globally that had been issued ISO 14001 certificates. A total of 155 countries had organisations participating in the scheme. The diagram below illustrates the ISO 2008 Survey results for ISO 14001:2004 standard.

ISO 14001 Standard - 2008 Survey ResultsThe ISO 14001 standard differs from ISO 14000. This is because ISO 14000 refers to the standards of the environmental management series developed by the International Standards Organisation while the ISO 14001 standard is the document containing specific EMS requirements.

The Anishinabe Nations of The Great Turtle Island have adopted the ISO 14001 as the preliminary foundation for the Anishinabe Environmental Assessment Authority.

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Read about ISO 14001 benefits.

Environmental Assessment for Anishinabe Nations of The Great Turtle Island

Anishinabe Nations of The Great Turtle Island Environmental Assessment – examines a project to determine what the environmental, social, economic and health implications may be; Public interest decision – the applicable AEB Board  decides whether it is in the public interest to let the project go ahead;

Approval with conditions – multiple regulators give formal approval to the project under various pieces of legislation. These approvals are in the Tribal Nations and People of The Tribal Nations interest, decision could be made by three potential boards, depending on the type of project.

The boards include the Anishinabe Utilities Commission (AUC), the Anishinabe Energy Resources Department (AERD) and The Great Turtle Island Resources Conservation Office (GTINRCO). set specific conditions under which the project can be constructed and operate; and Compliance – ensure that the project is operating within the specified approval conditions. All significant Resource and projects which affect or potentially effect the Environment will be required to go through the Anishinabe Environmental Assessment Process.

There are also environmental assessments conducted in Turtle Island which fall under the responsibility of ESRD and are mandated by EPEA regarding Water.

The Government of The Great Turtle Island, Individual Tribal Nations in the Federations, businesses and Bank institutions also undertake environmental assessment processes under their own laws and authority, for a variety of purposes.

EIA reports typically include:

• a detailed description of the project;

• the location and environmental setting for the project, and baseline environmental, social and culture information;

• the potential positive and negative environmental, health, social, economic and cultural effects of the proposed activity;

• plans to mitigate potential adverse effects and to respond to emergencies;

• information on public and (First Nations) Tribal consultation; and

• an assessment of cumulative effects .

 

 

In full retreat: the Canadian government’s new environmental assessment law undoes decades of progress

In full retreat: the Canadian government’s new environmental assessment law undoes decades of progress Robert B. Gibson a a Department of Environment and Resource Studies, University of Waterloo, Canada, N2L 3G1 Version of record first published: 11 Sep 2012.

Article Link. 

The Canadian Environmental Assessment Act 2012, which came into force on 6 July 2012, virtually eliminates the core of federal-level environmental assessment in Canada. Under the new law, federal environmental assessments will be few, fragmentary, inconsistent and late. Key decision-making will be discretionary and consequently unpredictable. Much of it will be cloaked in secrecy. The residual potential for effective, efficient and fair assessments will depend heavily on requirements under other federal legislation and on the uneven diversity of provincial, territorial and Aboriginal assessment processes. This paper reviews the key characteristics of the new law in light of 10 basic design principles for environmental assessment processes, and considers the broader international implications of the Canadian retreat from application of these principles.

Anishinabe Environmental assessment authority to be set up:

Anishinabe Environmental Assessment Directive (AEAD) applies to a wide range of public plans and programmes (e.g. on land use, transport, energy, waste, agriculture, etc).

Plans and programmes in the sense of the AEAD Directive must be prepared or adopted by an authority (at national, regional or local level) and be required by legislative, regulatory or administrative provisions.

An Environmental Assessment is mandatory for plans/programmes which are prepared for agriculture, forestry, fisheries, energy, industry, transport, waste/ water management, telecommunications, tourism, town & country planning or land use and which set the framework for future development consent of projects listed in the AEAD Directive.

OR

Have been determined to require an assessment under the AEAD Directive.

The AEAD procedure can be summarized as follows: an environmental report is prepared in which the likely significant effects on the environment and the reasonable alternatives of the proposed plan or programme are identified. The public and the environmental authorities are informed and consulted on the draft plan or programme and the environmental report prepared. As regards plans and programmes which are likely to have significant effects on the environment in another Member State, the Member State in whose territory the plan or programme is being prepared must consult the other Member State(s). On this issue the AEAD Directive follows the general approach taken by the AEAD Protocol.

The environmental report and the results of the consultations are taken into account before adoption. Once the plan or programme is adopted, the environmental authorities and the public are informed and relevant information is made available to them. In order to identify unforeseen adverse effects at an early stage, significant environmental effects of the plan or programme are to be monitored.

The AEAD requires the environmental authorities to be consulted at the screening stage;

the AEAD requires an assessment of reasonable alternatives (under the EIA the developer chooses the alternatives to be studied);

under the AEAD Member States must monitor the significant environmental effects of the implementation of plans/programmes in order to identify unforeseen adverse effects and undertake appropriate remedial action.

the AEAD obliges Member States to ensure that environmental reports are of a sufficient quality.