Category Archives: Industries

The RCMP is not now, nor has it ever been a civilian police force that serves, protects and defends Canada and its people.

Crown Soldiers

Crown military insignia

The RCMP is and has always been a military force. Its members are soldiers, not civilian police officers. The RCMP is a paramilitary force – a group of civilians who have betrayed their country by becoming a military force for a foreign entity that has no lawful authority to govern Canada. The RCMP is not now, nor has it ever been a civilian police force that serves, protects and defends Canada and its people. RCMP members serves, protects and defends an unelected foreign entity, and the foreign entity’s “corporate” interests in Canada. The foreign entity the RCMP unlawfully serve is the Crown.

The RCMP oath and the RCMP’s “military insignia” clearly indicates this allegiance to the “foreign” entity, the Crown. Notice the Crown with the Catholic Cross. Ask any RCMP soldier to recite his 3 part oath. Nowhere in their oath does it require the enlisted men and women to swear allegiance to Canada – to serve, protect and/or defend Canada.

The Crown is not the illegitimate (illegally reconciled with the See and Church of Rome, held communion with and professed the Catholic faith at her own coronation; married and became a Roman Catholic in violation of UK Act of Settlement law) German (family surname is Saxe-Coburg & Gotha; name Windsor fabricated and assumed in 1917 to conceal this fact after the her German monarchy and all German monarchies were abolished for high treason; levying World War I against the UK, Canada and Europe for the Crown) Queen of Canada and the UK.

The Crown represents the Catholic Church Pope. In 1855 the Catholic Pope crowned himself king of kings and “assumed” without lawful authority to be ruler of Canada, the United States, the UK and all nations. RCMP members commit high treason against Canada by levying war against Canada as a military force for a “foreign” entity, the Crown. ~S.E.R.T. SC/IWS/CI

We all eat out of the Dish – all of us unique peoples – but it only has one spoon.

Land Acknowledgement

“Toronto is in the ‘Dish With One Spoon Territory’. The Dish With One Spoon is a treaty between the Anishinaabe, Mississaugas and Haudenosaunee that bound them to share the territory and protect the land. Subsequent Indigenous nations and peoples, Europeans and all newcomers have been invited into this treaty in the spirit of peace, friendship and respect.”

“Toronto is in the ‘Dish With One Spoon Territory’. The Dish With One Spoon is a treaty between the Anishinaabe, Mississaugas and Haudenosaunee that bound them to share the territory and protect the land. Subsequent Indigenous nations and peoples, Europeans and all newcomers have been invited into this treaty in the spirit of peace, friendship and respect.”

To hereby be The “Dish” or sometimes it is called the “Bowl” represents what is now southern Ontario (from the Great Lake to Quebec and from Lake Simcoe into the U.S.). We all eat out of the Dish – all of us unique peoples – but it only has one spoon. That means we have to share and that we have responsibilities to make sure the dish is never empty (to take care of the land and the creatures we share it with). Importantly, there are no knives at the table. We must keep the peace. The dish is graphically represented by the wampum represented below:

file

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This was a treaty made between the Anishinaabe and Haudenosaunee after the French and Indian War. Newcomers were then incorporated into it over the years, notably at 1764 (The Royal Proclamation/The Treaty of Niagara).

The purpose of the acknowledgement started in B.C., where there are no treaties at all. So people were actually living, working, meeting on stolen land. Its popularity has spread as an acknowledgment of presence and assertion of Indigenous sovereignty. 

Land Acknowledgement at Ryerson University:

CEASE and DESIST issued to CANADA and PROVINCES July 5th 2016 for promoting themselves as Turtle Island

CEASE and DESIST issued to CANADA and PROVINCES July 5th 2016.

The Government of Turtle Island, issues  CANADA and PROVINCES an order To Cease and Desist promoting themselves as Turtle Island, Kannada, affiliated or representative in any matters of The Great Turtle Island, or as Kannada aka Anishinabe Village .  Websites infringement on  Anishinabe Nation of Turtle Island copyright. CANADA AND THE PROVINCES face Litigation for promoting CANADA AND OR PROVINCES referring to Turtle Island, any Canadian entity is ordered to Cease  and Desist doing so immediately for violating UCC.

 

Canada and The Provinces of Canada, are SEC Corporate Entities, promoting themselves as a Sovereign Country, thus Canada and The Provinces are Ultra Vires.

Government entities created by a state are public corporations governed by municipal charters and other statutorily imposed grants of power. These grants of authority are analogous to a private corporation’s articles of incorporation. Historically, the Ultra Vires concept has been used to construe the powers of a government entity narrowly. Failure to observe the statutory limits has been characterized as ultra vires.

In the case of a private business entity, the act of an employee who is not authorized to act on the entity’s behalf may,nevertheless, bind the entity contractually if such an employee would normally be expected to have that authority. Withgovernment entity, however, to prevent a contract from being voided as Ultra Vires, it is normally necessary to prove that the employee actually had authority to act. Where a government employee exceeds her authority, the government entity may seek to rescind the contract based on an ultra vires claim.

CANADA and The PROVINCES are violating the CONVENTION AGAINST CORRUPTION RATIFIED BY 30TH STATE, ENTERED INTO FORCE 14 DECEMBER 2005.

CANADA and The PROVINCES are violating THE VIENNA CONVENTION ON CONSULAR RELATIONS AND OPTIONAL PROTOCOLS

CANADA AND THE PROVINCES have, and continue to commit Fraud against the Anishinabe Nation of Turtle Island.

The following sites promote dealing with SEC Companies that are Ultra Vires  by promoting dealing with CANADA AND THE PROVINCES promoting licensing and laws, on Indigenous Land, which create Fraudulent Contracts, which are Ultra Vires.

CANADA AND THE PROVINCES Companies involved in Massive Global Fraud, against All People and Nations of The Great Turtle Island.

http://www.turtleislandstaffing.info/

https://holisticassessment.gov.sk.ca/digitalstories/aski/

Home

Home

 

 

http://www.turtleisland.org/resources/resources.htm

 

http://turtleisland.ca/

 

Turtle Island – Staffing Services – Ottawa

The Anishinabe Nation of Turtle Island, caution the Corporation of CANADA and THE PROVINCES about their continual Copyright infringements.

Originally the Settlers came to live in Anishinabe Villages called Kannada, the Settlers were / are referred to as Aboriginals, meaning not Originals.

 

 

 

 

Anishinabe Nation of The Great Turtle Island Environmental AEB Board Assessment

Anishinabe Nation of The Great Turtle Island Environmental Assessment – examines a project to determine what the environmental, social, economic and health implications may be; Public interest decision – the applicable AEB Board  decides whether it is in the public interest to let the project go ahead;

Approval with conditions – multiple regulators give formal approval to the project under various pieces of legislation. These approvals are in the Tribal Nations and People of The Tribal Nations interest, decision could be made by three potential boards, depending on the type of project.

The boards include the Anishinabe Utilities Commission (AUC), the Anishinabe Energy Resources Department (AERD) and The Great Turtle Island Resources Conservation Office (GTINRCO). set specific conditions under which the project can be constructed and operate; and Compliance – ensure that the project is operating within the specified approval conditions. All significant Resource and projects which affect or potentially effect the Environment will be required to go through the Anishinabe Environmental Assessment Process.

There are also environmental assessments conducted in Turtle Island which fall under the responsibility of ESRD and are mandated by EPEA regarding Water.

The Government of The Great Turtle Island, Individual Tribal Nations in the Federations, businesses and Bank institutions also undertake environmental assessment processes under their own laws and authority, for a variety of purposes.

EIA reports typically include:

• a detailed description of the project;

• the location and environmental setting for the project, and baseline environmental, social and culture information;

• the potential positive and negative environmental, health, social, economic and cultural effects of the proposed activity;

• plans to mitigate potential adverse effects and to respond to emergencies;

• information on public and (First Nations) Tribal consultation; and

• an assessment of cumulative effects .

AEB Anishinabe Environmental Assessment Board to study the Aliso Canyon LNG Environmental Disaster

While Corporate Enterprises are looking at partnering up on Indigenous land, The Turtle Island Government is concerned with the potential for Large Scale Environmental Disasters, specifically in regards to Pipelines, LNG , Land Storage, Proposed LNG Barges, and the increasing in Fracking practices in the industry, to examine projects to determine what the environmental, social, economic and health implications may be.

The large-scale natural gas leak at Aliso Canyon – is of great concern to The Government of The Anishinabe Nation, the increase in the potential for man made Natural Gas Environmental Disasters. The AEB Anishinabe Environmental Assessment Board ESRD, is looking into the Aliso Canyon Gas Leak.

Anishinabe Nation of The Great Turtle Island Environmental Assessment – adheres to ISO 14001 requirements,

The boards include the Anishinabe Utilities Commission (AUC), the Anishinabe Energy Resources Department (AERD) and The Great Turtle Island Resources Conservation Office (GTINRCO).

Aliso Canyon gas leak From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:

Aliso Canyon gas leak
Aliso Canyon gas leak site, Dec. 14, 2015 (23389378449).jpg

Aliso Canyon leak site on December 14, 2015
Duration October 23, 2015 – February 18, 2016
Location Aliso Canyon Oil Field, Porter Ranch, Los Angeles, California
Coordinates 34°18′54″N 118°33′51″WCoordinates: 34°18′54″N 118°33′51″W
Also known as Porter Ranch gas leak / blowout
Type Gas leak Blowout (well drilling)

Aliso Canyon is located in the Los Angeles metropolitan area

Aliso Canyon
Aliso Canyon

Gas leak site shown within the Los Angeles metropolitan area

Aliso Canyon SS 25 wellhead, December 17, 2015. Note subsidence craters at center, apparently from the attempts to plug the leaking well.

The Aliso Canyon gas leak (also called Porter Ranch gas leak[1] and Porter Ranch gas blowout[2]) was a massive natural gasleak that was discovered by SoCalGas employees on October 23, 2015.[3] Gas was released from a well within the Aliso Canyon’sunderground storage facility in the Santa Susana Mountains near Porter Ranch, Los Angeles.[4] The second-largest gas storage facility of its kind in the United States, it belongs to the Southern California Gas Company, a subsidiary of Sempra Energy. On January 6, 2016, Governor Jerry Brown issued a state of emergency.[5] The Aliso gas leak carbon footprint is said to be larger than the Deepwater Horizon leak in the Gulf of Mexico. On February 11, 2016 the gas company reported that it had the leak under control.[6]

On February 18, 2016, state officials announced that the leak was permanently plugged. An estimated 97,100 tonnes (95,600 long tons; 107,000 short tons) of methane and 7,300 tonnes (7,200 long tons; 8,000 short tons) of ethane was released into the atmosphere,[7] making it the worst natural gas leak in U.S. history in terms of its environmental impact.[8][9][10]

Continue reading AEB Anishinabe Environmental Assessment Board to study the Aliso Canyon LNG Environmental Disaster

Be It Known … I Chief Kathleen Robin Smith of Samahquam Indian Band will not allow myself to be stripped of my legal powers.

“As one can see … I Chief Kathleen Robin Smith of Samahquam Indian Band has been ostracised.

Be It Known … I Chief Kathleen Robin Smith of Samahquam Indian Band will not allow myself to be stripped of my legal powers.
Therefore, I Chief Kathleen Robin Smith of Samahquam Indian Band shall not take the position of Non-Voting Chair.
Furthermore, It is obvious that our Three Samahquam Councillors will indeed sign the BCRs approving the $1.6 Million that In-SHUCK-ch Nation requires in order to carry forward Eppa’s prescribed motions for our three Councillors to adopt.
I Chief Kathleen Robin Smith will not involve myself in anymore Back Door Politics. It is illegal.”

AEB Anishinabe Environmental Assessment Board ESRD are mandated by EPEP regarding Water.

Anishinabe Nations of The Great Turtle Island Environmental Assessment – examines a project to determine what the environmental, social, economic and health implications may be; Public interest decision – the applicable AEB Board  decides whether it is in the public interest to let the project go ahead;

Approval with conditions – multiple regulators give formal approval to the project under various pieces of legislation. These approvals are in the Tribal Nations and People of The Tribal Nations interest, decision could be made by three potential boards, depending on the type of project.

The boards include the Anishinabe Utilities Commission (AUC), the Anishinabe Energy Resources Department (AERD) and The Great Turtle Island Resources Conservation Office (GTINRCO). set specific conditions under which the project can be constructed and operate; and Compliance – ensure that the project is operating within the specified approval conditions. All significant Resource and projects which affect or potentially effect the Environment will be required to go through the Anishinabe Environmental Assessment Process.

There are also environmental assessments conducted in Turtle Island which fall under the responsibility of ESRD and are mandated by EPEP regarding Water.

The Government of The Great Turtle Island, Individual Tribal Nations in the Federations, businesses and Bank institutions also undertake environmental assessment processes under their own laws and authority, for a variety of purposes.

EIA reports typically include:

• a detailed description of the project;

• the location and environmental setting for the project, and baseline environmental, social and culture information;

• the potential positive and negative environmental, health, social, economic and cultural effects of the proposed activity;

• plans to mitigate potential adverse effects and to respond to emergencies;

• information on public and (First Nations) Tribal consultation; and

• an assessment of cumulative effects .

The Great Turtle Island Resources Conservation Office (GTINRCO)

Anishinabe Nations of The Great Turtle Island Environmental Assessment – examines a project to determine what the environmental, social, economic and health implications may be; Public interest decision – the applicable AEB Board  decides whether it is in the public interest to let the project go ahead;

Approval with conditions – multiple regulators give formal approval to the project under various pieces of legislation. These approvals are in the Tribal Nations and People of The Tribal Nations interest, decision could be made by three potential boards, depending on the type of project.

The boards include the Anishinabe Utilities Commission (AUC), the Anishinabe Energy Resources Department (AERD) and The Great Turtle Island Resources Conservation Office (GTINRCO). set specific conditions under which the project can be constructed and operate; and Compliance – ensure that the project is operating within the specified approval conditions. All significant Resource and projects which affect or potentially effect the Environment will be required to go through the Anishinabe Environmental Assessment Process.

There are also environmental assessments conducted in Turtle Island which fall under the responsibility of ESRD and are mandated by EPEA regarding Water.

The Government of The Great Turtle Island, Individual Tribal Nations in the Federations, businesses and Bank institutions also undertake environmental assessment processes under their own laws and authority, for a variety of purposes.

EIA reports typically include:

• a detailed description of the project;

• the location and environmental setting for the project, and baseline environmental, social and culture information;

• the potential positive and negative environmental, health, social, economic and cultural effects of the proposed activity;

• plans to mitigate potential adverse effects and to respond to emergencies;

• information on public and (First Nations) Tribal consultation; and

• an assessment of cumulative effects .

Anishinabe Energy Resources Department (AERD)

Anishinabe Nations of The Great Turtle Island Environmental Assessment – examines a project to determine what the environmental, social, economic and health implications may be; Public interest decision – the applicable AEB Board  decides whether it is in the public interest to let the project go ahead;

Approval with conditions – multiple regulators give formal approval to the project under various pieces of legislation. These approvals are in the Tribal Nations and People of The Tribal Nations interest, decision could be made by three potential boards, depending on the type of project.

The boards include the Anishinabe Utilities Commission (AUC), the Anishinabe Energy Resources Department (AERD) and The Great Turtle Island Resources Conservation Office (GTINRCO). set specific conditions under which the project can be constructed and operate; and Compliance – ensure that the project is operating within the specified approval conditions. All significant Resource and projects which affect or potentially effect the Environment will be required to go through the Anishinabe Environmental Assessment Process.

There are also environmental assessments conducted in Turtle Island which fall under the responsibility of ESRD and are mandated by EPEA regarding Water.

The Government of The Great Turtle Island, Individual Tribal Nations in the Federations, businesses and Bank institutions also undertake environmental assessment processes under their own laws and authority, for a variety of purposes.

EIA reports typically include:

• a detailed description of the project;

• the location and environmental setting for the project, and baseline environmental, social and culture information;

• the potential positive and negative environmental, health, social, economic and cultural effects of the proposed activity;

• plans to mitigate potential adverse effects and to respond to emergencies;

• information on public and (First Nations) Tribal consultation; and

• an assessment of cumulative effects .

Anishinabe Utilities Commission (AUC)

Anishinabe Nations of The Great Turtle Island Environmental Assessment – examines a project to determine what the environmental, social, economic and health implications may be; Public interest decision – the applicable AEB Board  decides whether it is in the public interest to let the project go ahead;

Approval with conditions – multiple regulators give formal approval to the project under various pieces of legislation. These approvals are in the Tribal Nations and People of The Tribal Nations interest, decision could be made by three potential boards, depending on the type of project.

The boards include the Anishinabe Utilities Commission (AUC), the Anishinabe Energy Resources Department (AERD) and The Great Turtle Island Resources Conservation Office (GTINRCO). set specific conditions under which the project can be constructed and operate; and Compliance – ensure that the project is operating within the specified approval conditions. All significant Resource and projects which affect or potentially effect the Environment will be required to go through the Anishinabe Environmental Assessment Process.

There are also environmental assessments conducted in Turtle Island which fall under the responsibility of ESRD and are mandated by EPEA regarding Water.

The Government of The Great Turtle Island, Individual Tribal Nations in the Federations, businesses and Bank institutions also undertake environmental assessment processes under their own laws and authority, for a variety of purposes.

EIA reports typically include:

• a detailed description of the project;

• the location and environmental setting for the project, and baseline environmental, social and culture information;

• the potential positive and negative environmental, health, social, economic and cultural effects of the proposed activity;

• plans to mitigate potential adverse effects and to respond to emergencies;

• information on public and (First Nations) Tribal consultation; and

• an assessment of cumulative effects .